Sep 202014
 

http://wikileaks.org/cable/2006/08/06MANILA3412.html#

Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
06MANILA3412 2006-08-15 08:18 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Manila
VZCZCXRO0447
RR RUEHCHI RUEHDT RUEHHM
DE RUEHML #3412/01 2270818
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 150818Z AUG 06
FM AMEMBASSY MANILA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 2493
INFO RUCPDOC/USDOC WASHDC
RUEATRS/DEPT OF TREASURY WASHDC
RUEHZS/ASEAN COLLECTIVE
UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 02 MANILA 003412

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

STATE FOR EB/IFD/OIA; EAP/MTS
STATE PASS USTR FOR BWEISEL AND DKATZ
STATE PASS USAID
TREASURY FOR OASIA FOR AJEWELL
USDOC FOR 4430/ITA/MAC/DBISBEE

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: ECPS EINT EAID SOCI APEC RP
SUBJECT: PHILIPPINE BROADBAND: NARROWING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

——-
SUMMARY
——-

¶1. Private companies are partnering with Philippine’s network of
5,443 public secondary schools to install computer laboratories by
¶2010. Over 800 schools have been connected to date, and 200 more
will enjoy the benefits of these labs by December, 2006. A USAID
program has contributed hardware, software, training, and
connectivity to 330 high schools in the conflict-affected area of
Mindanao. End Summary.

————————
HISTORY OF COMPUTER LABS
————————

¶2. The 45-year old Ayala Foundation, founded to improve the quality
of life of Filipinos, launched its Youth Tech program to install
computers with internet connectivity in schools in 2000.
Twenty-eight private corporations banded together in 2001 to form
ConnectEd. By the end of 2004, 170 high schools had internet
connectivity compliments of Youth Tech, and ConnectEd had touched
another 80 schools for a total of 323 high schools with internet
access.

¶3. The Department of Trade and Industry started the Personal
Computers for Public Schools (PCPS) program in 2004, aimed to
increase computer literacy. The Japanese donated computers to the
Philippines via a government-to-government to place computer labs in
2,096 public schools.

—————————————–
PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP UPS THE ACCESS
—————————————–

¶4. Government and private corporations’ efforts were fused and
expanded in 2005 under the banner of “Gearing up Internet Literacy
Access for Students” (GILAS). Senator Manuel Roxas, the force
behind PCPS when he was the Trade and Industry Secretary, and
President and CEO of the Ayala Corporation, Jaime A. Ayala II,
signed on as co-chairs of GILAS. The vision of the project is to
install computer labs in all of the Philippines’ high schools by
¶2010. President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo endorsed this initiative
and committed her team to working with GILAS for the program’s
successful outcome.

¶5. Dell Chairman Michael Dell inaugurated the GILAS program in
Pasay City East High School near Manila in March 2006. Dell has
donated a total of seven computers and provided training to high
school students and teachers. Dell employees 300 individuals in its
new Manila call center, which will eventually reach 1,400 employees.

¶6. In a meeting with Ramon Sales, Chairman of the Commission on
Information and Communications Technology, told EconOffs that the
GRP earmarked 270 million pesos (1 USD = 52 Philippine Pesos) for
this project in the 2005-06 budget. Over 800 high schools
throughout the country are connected, with an additional 200
expected on-line by year-end. Each lab contains 20 computers; 15
dedicated for student use and five for the teachers and
administration.

——————————————-
USAID PROGRAMS FURTHER SUPPORT CONNECTIVITY
——————————————-

¶7. USAID’s Computer Literacy and Internet Connection (CLIC) has
complimented the GILAS program in the Autonomous Region in Muslim
Mindanao and other conflict-affected areas of Mindanao by
introducing computer and internet education into 330 high schools.
CLIC will provide 270 more schools with up to ten computers,
software, a printer, a local area network, and satellite or
microwave-based internet connections.

¶8. USAID has partnered with several U.S. companies, including
Microsoft, Intel, IBM, and Cisco Systems to provide hardware,
software, and training at significantly reduced prices for these
Mindanao high schools. To date, 9,000 teachers and 300,000 students
have benefited from CLIC. USAID’s arrangement with the Ayala
Foundation enabled internet connections for 45 high schools in this
province with computers from the GILAS program.

——–
COMMENT
——–

MANILA 00003412 002 OF 002

¶9. These ambitious programs are a good start to help compensate for
poorly stocked, out-of-date school libraries, promote more
educational standardization, and help with computer literacy to
enable high school graduates with their job searches. Corporations
seeking to start or expand call centers in the Philippines, as Dell
has done, will be likely supporters of the GILAS program. The USG’s
commitment to supply and connect Mindanao high schools add to this
tremendous momentum.

JONES

   

 

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