Oct 272014
 

http://wikileaks.org/cable/2009/10/09MANILA2271.html#
Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
09MANILA2271
2009-10-28 08:05
2011-08-30 01:44
UNCLASSIFIED//FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
Embassy Manila

VZCZCXRO2186
OO RUEHCHI RUEHCN RUEHDT RUEHHM
DE RUEHML #2271/01 3010805
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 280805Z OCT 09 ZDK
FM AMEMBASSY MANILA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 5587
INFO RUEHZS/ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN NATIONS IMMEDIATE
RUEHLM/AMEMBASSY COLOMBO IMMEDIATE 2895
RUEHKA/AMEMBASSY DHAKA IMMEDIATE 2552
RUEHSV/AMEMBASSY SUVA IMMEDIATE 0150
RHHMUNA/CDRUSPACOM HONOLULU HI IMMEDIATE
RHEHNSC/NSC WASHDC IMMEDIATE
UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 MANILA 002271

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

STATE FOR EAP/RSP, PM/PPA (J KNOCH, S KWAK); USPACOM FOR
J5; SECDEF/OSD/ISA/AP

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL PTER KTIA MARR MASS MOPS MCAP BG CB CE
ID, FJ, MY, TH, RP
SUBJECT: MANILA ENDORSEMENT FOR FY10 1206 PROPOSAL FOR PACOM REGION

REF: STATE 92407

¶1. (SBU) Summary: Representatives of Embassies Manila,
Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Suva (for Tonga), Phnom Penh,
Dhaka and Colombo (for Maldives) met with U.S. Pacific
Command (PACOM) representatives in Bangkok in August 2009 to
finalize FY2010 regional 1206 proposals approved by PACOM
with active coordination from other regional missions. This
year’s $97.2 million Combatant Command request includes
funding for Tongan participation in military operations in
Afghanistan, immediate operational requirements for the
Philippines and urgent and emergent CT efforts in Maldives,
Bangladesh, Malaysia, Indonesia, Cambodia, and Thailand.
Embassy Manila strongly endorses the regional 1206 proposals
and concurs with the prioritization agreed to in the working
group meeting in August in Bangkok. End Summary.

A REGIONAL PROPOSAL AFFECTING THREE KEY AREAS
———————————————

¶2. (SBU) DOD and State officials from Embassies Manila,
Jakarta, Kuala Lumpur, Bangkok, Phnom Penh, Dhaka, Suva and
Colombo, in collaboration with PACOM, developed 1206
proposals designed to promote host-nation capabilities to
counter threats in the PACOM region. The FY10 proposal for
1206 includes funding for Tongan military participation in
military operations in Afghanistan, and builds upon past
efforts which established capacity to interdict near the
Strait of Malacca and the Sulu and Sulawesi Seas. This year
we have also focused on emerging threats in Maldives,
Cambodia, Bangladesh, and Malaysia. These areas are
priorities in the war on terrorism in South and Southeast
Asia.

¶3. (SBU) Our top FY10 CT proposals facilitate direct
engagement of terrorist networks. In addition to direct
engagement, a number of PACOM proposals advance the effort to
build maritime domain awareness and provide synergy among
maritime radar systems, including uniformity of equipment
that would facilitate future interoperability among maritime
security efforts. We also aim to develop command and control
centers to integrate maritime intelligence and extend
targeted counterterrorism capabilities while developing
host-nation interdiction and counterterrorism capabilities.
As mandated, human rights training will be included as part
of all approved 1206 programs.

¶4. (SBU) PACOM worked with interagency representatives across
South and Southeast Asia to provide a conceptual framework
for individual country proposals. Early versions of the 1206
proposals were presented at the PACOM Security Assistance
Conference in June for preliminary review, and all CT
proposals were reviewed again at a working group in August
with the participation of members across the interagency
including DOS political officers, Joint Interagency Task
Force-West, Offices of Defense Cooperation, and
representatives from the different sections of PACOM.
Subsequently, all proposals were further vetted before being
approved by the PACOM Commander. The counterterrorism review
criteria included: documented urgent or emergent terrorist
threats; capability gaps related to terrorist threats;
alignment with the Ambassador’s Mission Strategic Plan and
PACOM’s Theater Campaign Plan; sustainable by host nation;
capable of being carried out on time and within budget;
consistent with program requirements; not inimical to U.S.
interests (Leahy law); within host nation absorption
capacity; and acceptable to partner nations.

¶5. (SBU) The result of the PACOM Security Assistance
Conference in June and the working group meeting in Bangkok
in August was the following list of proposed projects (in
rank order):

(1) Tonga, Tonga Deployment to Afghanistan (Stability
Operations), $1.3 m
(2) Philippines, Equipment to Support Close Air Support
Operations (Counter-Terrorism), $8.0 m
(3) Philippines, Force Recon Bn Marine Strike Company (CT),
$9.3 m
(4) Bangladesh, Multi-Mission Cooperation, Mobility, Weapons
and Night Vision Devices (NVDs) (CT), $9.6 m

MANILA 00002271 002 OF 003

(5) Maldives, CT and Intelligence Package (CT), $3.4 m
(6) Malaysia, CT Interagency Communications (CT), $7.0 m
(7) Indonesia, Helicopter Interdiction Capability (CT), $7.6 m
(8) Indonesia, Naval Maritime Interdiction Capability (CT),
$12.5
(9) Cambodia, National Counter Terrorism Special Force Ground
Equipment (CT), $6.3 m
(10) Philippines, Equipment for the Naval Special Operations
Unit (CT), $6.0 m
(11) Thailand, IED Site Mitigation and Forensic Tracking
(Army) (CT), $2.0 m
(12) Philippines, Inshore Boat Battalion (CT), $10.8 m
(13) Cambodia, Maritime C3 and Coastal Watch (CT), $7.3 m
(14) Cambodia, Maritime CT Unit, $6.1 m

TOTAL $97.2 m

¶6. (SBU) Embassy Manila strongly endorses the regional 1206
proposals and concurs with the prioritization listed in para.
¶4. The following is a summary of Embassy Manila’s proposed
projects (additional information is available upon request):

— Equipment to Support Close Air Support (CAS) Operations
($8.0 m).

Project Description: Provide the Armed Forces of the
Philippines (AFP) with critical components required to
augment current AFP systems and allow a precision-guided
munitions (PGM) capability, including laptop computers loaded
with software to program and control the weapons systems; a
wireless link to the weapon guidance systems for bombs;
Rockwell/Collins TALON V / UHF radios for aircraft; upgraded
equipment and training for AFP Forward Air Controllers (PFAC)
to support CAS operations. By providing a common, secure
communication link between AFP aviation assets fitted with
precision guided munitions and PFACs, the armed forces will
be able to independently develop and respond to real-time
actionable intelligence with their airborne weaponry. The
proposed program would provide the AFP with critical
components required to augment current systems to attain PGM
capability, while keeping U.S. control of sensitive
technology.

— Force Reconnaissance Battalion Marine Strike Company ($9.3
m).

Project Description: Increase the ability of the AFP’s Force
Reconnaissance Battalion (FRBn) to fully integrate and
operate as one of the premier Tier 1 Coast Watch South (CWS)
interdiction units. Currently, the FRBn does not work with
the Joint Special Operations Group (JSOG) or CWS, although
they are outfitted with a fleet of Combat Rubber Raiding
Craft (CRRC) and are tactically and doctrinally matched with
the JSOG mission. The FRBn Marine Strike Companies are
comprised of four distinct, yet complementary elements:
Direct Action Squads, Security Teams, Reconnaissance and
Surveillance Teams and Sniper Teams. Provision of tailored,
mission-specific packages comprised of weapons, navigation
and communication equipment, night vision and personal
protective gear will enable the FRBn to integrate into the
JSOG. The JSOG will be immeasurably enhanced by addition of
the FRBn Marine Strike Companies. This will build upon and
complete the FRBn outfitting project begun with FY09 1206
funding to outfit the first FRBn Strike Company.

— Equipment for Naval Special Operation Units ($6.0 m)

Project Description: Increase the ability of the AFP’s Naval
Special Operations Units (SOUs) to fully integrate and
operate with the AFP’s Joint Special Operations Group and as
one of the premier Coast Watch South interdiction units.
Combat Rubber Raiding Craft (CRRC) will provide a flexible,
inexpensive and easily maintained platform from which naval
SOU’s can conduct near-shore interdiction and vessel boarding
search and seizure, combined reconnaissance and surveillance,
and littoral insertion and extraction. CRRC’s are easily
integrated into the current Philippine Navy 78-foot Patrol
Craft platform for rapid deployment and increased range of
operations. Integrated weapons, navigation and
communications equipment will make the naval SOU’s extremely
effective interdiction and apprehension platforms.

MANILA 00002271 003 OF 003

— Inshore Boat Battalion ($10.8 m)

Project Description: Provide U.S. Marine Corps Small Unit
Riverine Craft (SURC) for riverine and inshore patrols,
insert and extract operations, and blockade missions to the
Inshore Boat Battalion (IBBn). The IBBn is primarily
deployed to the Western Mindanao Command. The SURC will
allow IBBn to operate in two feet of water and land Marines
onshore or conduct intercept and boarding operations in Sea
State 3. The package will include crew served weapons, night
vision, GPS and radar navigation, secure communications and
personal team equipment.

SUPPORTS KEY U.S. STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES
————————————–

¶7. (SBU) Combating terrorism and promoting regional stability
in South and Southeast Asia are key U.S. national priorities
and Section 1206 assistance is a central component of USG
efforts to achieve these objectives.

¶8. (SBU) Our FY10 1206 proposal would provide essential
counter-terrorism capabilities to key partner nations in the
region and would afford the United States unique
opportunities to influence and shape a regional counter
terrorism strategy. Most immediately, it would provide a
capability to disrupt violent extremist organizations such as
Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf Group, and other terrorist
organizations. The proposed projects seek to complement and
support planned and existing multilateral efforts, such as
the Department’s Regional Strategic Initiative and trilateral
maritime security talks between Indonesia, Malaysia, and the
Philippines.

LEAHY VETTING
————-

¶9. (SBU) Embassy Manila affirms that it is not aware of any
credible evidence of gross violations of human rights by any
units which would receive assistance under the 1206 project
proposals listed in para. 4. Embassy Manila also
acknowledges the requirement to undertake Leahy vetting for
all units, if the projects are funded, per normal foreign
assistance procedures (as requested in para. 11 of Reftel).

POINTS OF CONTACT
—————–

¶10. (U) For PACOM, please contact:

CDR Gerry Job
Phone: 808-477-0928
Unclass Gerald.job@pacom.mil
Classified Gerald.job@pacom.smil.mil, or

MAJ Robert Hawthorne
Phone: 808-477-9539
Unclass robert.hawthorne@pacom.mil
Classified Robert.hawthorne@pacom.smil.mil, or

MAJ Tom Stevenson
Phone: 808-477-0943
Unclass Thomas.m.stevenson@pacom.mil
Classified Thomas.stevenson@pacom.smil.mil

For Embassy Manila, please contact:

Peter Hemsch
Phone: 63-2-301-2000 x6305
Unclass hemschpg@state.gov
Classified hemschpg@state.sgov.gov
KENNEY

   

 

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