Sep 152014
 

http://wikileaks.org/cable/2005/12/05MANILA5709.html#
Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
05MANILA5709
2005-12-07 08:49
2011-08-30 01:44
CONFIDENTIAL
Embassy Manila

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.
C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 MANILA 005709

SIPDIS

STATE FOR EAP, SCT/CRUMPTON, INR/EAP, EAP/RSP, EAP/MTS,
EAP/MLS, EAP/J, DS/ATA
USPACOM ALSO FOR FPA HUSO
SECDEF/OSD/ISA/AP FOR ALLEN

E.O. 12958: DECL: 12/05/2015
TAGS: PTER PREL PGOV ASEC AS JA RP
SUBJECT: FURTHER GROUNDWORK ON PROPOSED TRILATERAL COUNTERTERRORISM COOPERATION CONFERENCE

REF: A. MANILA 5486
¶B. STATE 191306

Classified By: (U) Acting Political Counselor Joseph L. Novak
for reasons 1.4(b) and (d).

¶1. (C/NF) Summary. The Japanese are now seeking to shift
the dates of the proposed Trilateral Terrorism Cooperation
Conference in Manila from mid-January to early February 2006.
The primary focus of the meeting would be on maritime
security, with help for Philippine National Police (PNP)
reform and “peace building activities” also suggested items
for the agenda. End Summary.

¶2. (C/REL AUS/REL JPN) In a follow-up to the November 22
working level talks on the proposed Manila Trilateral
Counterterrorism Cooperation Conference (refs A and B), an
expanded group from the Japanese, Australian, and US
Embassies, including development assistance, law enforcement,
military, and security officials, met December 2 for a
roundtable discussion. The meeting was hosted by the
Japanese Embassy with the aim of reviewing bilateral
cooperation with the GRP and examining possible agenda items
for the Manila Trilateral discussions. Japanese Political
Counselor Taeko Takahashi indicated that Tokyo was now
looking to host the conference in Manila in early February
2006, vice the earlier proposed dates of mid-January. She
said the Japanese agreed the primary focus should be on
maritime security issues.

¶3. (SBU) In a review of bilateral programs, Japanese
representatives noted that, in addition to development
assistance targeting Mindanao, Japanese counterterrorism
assistance was devoted primarily to the PNP and Philippine
Coast Guard. GoA representatives remarked that Australia,
like the United States, devotes 60-percent of its development
aid to Mindanao. (Note: The Philippines currently receives
A$55 million — roughly $40 million USD — in annual
development assistance, making it the 6th largest recipient
of Australian aid. End Note.) Similar to US programs,
Australian efforts are focused on the underlying poverty and
underdevelopment that help create the conditions for
terrorism, including terrorist recruitment. Australian
bilateral counterterrorism assistance, which was increased in
May 2005 to A$10 million (roughly $7.5 million USD) over five
years, is directed at building the counterterrorism
capabilities of the PNP, National Bureau of Investigation
(NBI), and the Philippine Center for Transnational Crime
(PCTC).

¶4. (C/REL AUS/REL JPN) According to Australian Defense
Attache Colonel Chris Burns, Australia has decided to supply
15 small boats to the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP)
for use in riverine and marsh operations in central Mindanao.
This package would include spare parts and training.
Australia was also pursuing a maritime security initiative
that would assist the Philippines in establishing a “coast
watch” system in Mindanao. Burns said an Australian maritime
needs analyst was now in country conducting an overall
assessment. He offered to share the results of this
assessment with Japanese and US counterparts.

¶5. (C/REL AUS/REL JPN) Ian Sinclair, the resident Australian
Police Advisor, noted that bilateral GoA law enforcement
assistance was focused on the PNP Bomb Data Center,
development of a case management system for the PNP, NBI, and
PCTC, post-blast investigation skills, and intelligence
training, dealing with both tactical and strategic skills.
Sinclair said the case management system consisted of a
central data base linking the PNP, NBI, and PCTC, with
outstations — including terminals in Zamboanga, Davao, and
General Santos City — providing national coverage. The
planned installation of terminals in a total of 168 locations
would provide the GRP with a central counterterrorism
intelligence data base, which would encourage interagency
cooperation, the Australians hoped.

¶6. (C/REL AUS/REL JPN) The US side briefed on its extensive
counterterrorism cooperation, which include: USAID
development assistance; Joint US Military Advisory
Group-Philippines (JUSMAG-P) support for defense reform;
Joint Special Operations Task Force-Philippines (JSOTF-P)
advice; assistance, and intelligence fusion to the AFP and
civil-military operations in Mindanao; Joint Interagency Task
Force-West (JIATF-West) maritime intelligence fusion centers;
and INL-funded interagency law enforcement assessment of the
PNP. Takahashi suggested that the upcoming conference could
focus on additional areas where there appeared to be
synergies among the Australian, Japanese, and US efforts.

¶7. (C/REL AUS/REL JPN) In addition to maritime security,
Takahashi thought coordinating efforts with the Philippine
Coast Guard (PCG) and PNP were worth considering, as well as
development of programs to promote more tolerant madrassah
curriculum. She proposed that the Australian maritime needs
assessment be presented as a paper at the February
conference, with each country taking the lead on a concept
paper on a specific issue, identifying weaknesses and
potential areas of support and cooperation on the issues of
maritime security — including the PCG (Australia), PNP
reform (US), and “peace building activities” (Japan). (Note:
Takahashi stated that Tokyo hoped that the intelligence
exchange in February on the situation in the southern
Philippines could occur at “above the secret level.” End
Note.)

Visit Embassy Manila’s Classified website:
http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/eap/manila/index. cfm
Jones

   

 

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