Sep 192014
 

http://wikileaks.org/cable/2007/03/07MANILA748.html#

Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
07MANILA748 2007-03-08 05:01 2011-08-30 01:44 CONFIDENTIAL Embassy Manila
VZCZCXRO9210
OO RUEHCHI RUEHDT RUEHHM
DE RUEHML #0748 0670501
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
O 080501Z MAR 07
FM AMEMBASSY MANILA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 5568
INFO RUEHZS/ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEAST ASIAN NATIONS IMMEDIATE
RHHMUNA/CDRUSPACOM HONOLULU HI IMMEDIATE
C O N F I D E N T I A L MANILA 000748

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: DECL: 03/08/2012
TAGS: PREL ECIN RP
SUBJECT: ENGAGING ASEAN: RECONSIDERING THE TREATY OF AMITY AND COOPERATION

REF: A. MANILA 499

¶B. MANILA 408

Classified By: Ambassador Kristie A. Kenney, reason 1.4 (d)

¶1. (C) President Arroyo and Foreign Secretary Romulo, as
Chair of ASEAN, have requested that the U.S. accede to the
Treaty of Amity and Cooperation in Southeast Asia (TAC).
They note that most of ASEAN’s other partners have signed the
treaty, that the treaty is largely a generic expression of
principles, and that a U.S. signature during this 30th year
anniversary of U.S.-ASEAN ties would highlight the growing
U.S.-ASEAN relationship. The Philippines wants, as Secretary
Romulo put it in his February 13 letter to the Secretary (ref
a), “deeper U.S. engagement in our emerging regional
architecture.” President Arroyo, who raised the issue with
President Bush at APEC last November, sees U.S. accession to
the treaty as a way to open the door wider to a greater U.S.
regional role.

¶2. (C) A U.S. expression of interest in signing the treaty
would reflect our recognition of the growing maturity of
ASEAN and its increasing focus on counterterrorsim and
regional security, including on issues important to us like
Burma and North Korea, which the Philippines has championed.
By contrast, what appears here as our continued unwillingness
to support the treaty strikes many in the Philippines (and we
suspect elsewhere in the region) as a sign that the U.S. is
not as engaged in the region as China and other key ASEAN
partners. President Arroyo and Philippine officials
understand that the U.S. would likely express certain
reservations about the treaty, as did the Australians, and
that the U.S. President would not attend the East Asia Summit
as an outcome of signing (although we might well want to have
a more senior presence than in the past – ref b).

¶3. (C) Meanwhile, the Philippine Department of Foreign
Affairs just confirmed to us that the EU is expected formally
to declare its intention to accede to the treaty at an
EU/ASEAN meeting in Nuremberg March 14-15 (formal EU
accession will have to await an amendment to the treaty,
which currently permits accession only by sovereign states,
not organizations).

¶4. (C) Action request: Embassy believes that signing the
treaty during this 30th anniversary year of U.S.-ASEAN
relations would bring considerable public diplomacy gains
here in the Philippines and in the region, while underscoring
to our partners serious U.S. intent to ratchet up our
regional role. We would cement, in their minds, our interest
in the region at a time when China, the EU, and others are
seeking a wider role. A thoughtful, encouraging response to
Secretary Romulo would also align well with Philippine

SIPDIS
successes against terrorism here. An announcement at the
ASEAN Regional Forum of a U.S. intent to sign the treaty by
the Secretary, if she is able to attend, would be an
excellent way to underscore U.S. engagement in the region.

Visit Embassy Manila’s Classified SIPRNET website:
http://www.state.sgov.gov/p/eap/manila/index. cfm

You can also access this site through the State Department’s
Classified SIPRNET website:
http:// www.state.sgov.gov/

KENNEY

   

 

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