Oct 092014
 

http://wikileaks.org/cable/2007/02/07MANILA553.html#

Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
07MANILA553 2007-02-20 08:03 2011-08-30 01:44 UNCLASSIFIED Embassy Manila
VZCZCXRO1658
OO RUEHDT RUEHPB
DE RUEHML #0553/01 0510803
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 200803Z FEB 07
FM AMEMBASSY MANILA
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 5315
INFO RUCNARF/ASEAN REGIONAL FORUM COLLECTIVE
RHHMUNA/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI
UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 MANILA 000553

SIPDIS

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL RP
SUBJECT: CO-CHAIRS’ SUMMARY REPORT OF THE SECOND MEETING OF THE ASEAN ARF EEPS, FEBRUARY 5-6, 2007 IN MANILA

¶1. The Department of Foreign Affairs has requested that Embassy
forward to relevant U.S. authorities the summary report from the ARF
EEP meeting in Manila. Full text in para 3.

¶2. Cover letter:
quote

Department of Foreign Affairs
Republic of the Philippines

12 February 2007

Dear Colleagues,

I am pleased to provide you the Co-Chairs’ Summary Report of the
Second Meeting of the ASEAN Regional Forum Experts and Eminent
Persons (ARF EEPs) held last 5-6 February 2007 in Manila.

With my best regards,

Sincerely yours,
/s/
Erlinda F. Basilio
Undersecretary for Policy and
ARF SOM Leader-Philippines

ARF SO Leaders
ASEAN Secretariat
End quote

¶3. Report:
Quote
CO-CHAIRS’ SUMMARY REPORT OF THE SECOND MEETING OF THE EXPERTS AND
EMINENT PERSONS, THE ASEAN REGIONAL FORUM
Manila, the Philippines 5-6 February 2007

¶1. The Second Meeting of Experts and Eminent Persons (EEPs) of the
ARF was held in Manila, the Philippines on February 5-6, 2007 in
order to discuss multilateral security cooperation in Northeast
Asia. The meeting was co-chaired by elected EEPs, Carolina
Hernandez from the Philippines, ARF Chair country and Chung-in Moon
of the Republic of Korea. The meeting was attended by 26 EEPs and
40 observers from 25 countries, and the ASEAN Secretariat.

¶2. H.E. Dr. Alberto G. Romulo, Secretary of Foreign Affairs of the
Republic of the Philippines and Chairman of the ASEAN Regional
Forum, delivered the welcoming remarks and recalled the
recommendations of the 13th ARF in Kuala Lumpur in July 2006. Given
the current situation on the Korean Peninsula, the Secretary noted
the timeliness of this meeting’s theme and reaffirmed ARF’s support
for the September 19, 2005 Joint Statement to establish a
nuclear-free Korean Peninsula and for UN Security Council
Resolutions 1695 and 1718. He noted the steady progress of
trilateral cooperation among Northeast Asian countries as evidenced
by the recent Summit Meeting of China, Japan and ROK held in Cebu,
the Philippines in January 2007. He then stressed the need for the
ARF to move closer toward preventive diplomacy and reaffirmed the
Philippines’ enhanced role and regional leadership as ARF Chair.

¶3. The meeting was organized into four sessions: the overall
security situation in Northeast Asia; non-traditional security
issues in Northeast Asia; lessons from other regional security
cooperation and their implications for Northeast Asia: EU and ASEAN
cases; and enhancement of multilateral security cooperation in
Northeast Asia: what and how.

Overall Security Situation in Northeast Asia

¶4. Despite the relative peace and the growing economic and
socio-cultural interdependence among countries in the region, the
overall security situation in Northeast Asia has remained precarious
and uncertain.

¶5. The DPRK’s nuclear program is a serious threat to the peace and
security of Northeast Asia. The EEPs encouraged the full
implementation of the September 19, 2005 Joint Statement which
reaffirmed the role of the Six Party Talk process as the most viable
mechanism for the peaceful resolution of the nuclear problem. Full
and concerted implementation of UN Security Resolution 1718 was also
strongly encouraged to dissuade the DPRK’s nuclear ambitions.

¶6. The rise of China and Japan’s move to become a ‘normal state’
should not have a negative impact on the security situation in
Northeast Asia so long as China’s rise remains peaceful and the
US-Japan security alliance remains stable. Concerns were also
raised on the issues of history and nationalism, and their adverse
effect on regional cooperation in Northeast Asia.

¶7. Multilateral security cooperation in Northeast Asia, in the
opinion of the EEPs is the best approach to cope with actual

MANILA 00000553 002 OF 003

security challenges.

Non-Traditional Security Issues in Northeast Asia

¶8. While Northeast Asia lack a multilateral security institution
other than the Six Party Talks process, Non traditional security
(NTS) concerns offer opportunities for regional cooperation
especially in environmental security, energy security, and
infectious diseases. In addition, the need for cooperation in
counter-terrorism, maritime security and human security, such as the
issue of refugees, was also emphasized.

¶9. In order to cope with non-traditional security issues it was
suggested that northeast Asian countries actively pursue
comprehensive and cooperative security and where relevant, learn
from the experiences of other regions such as ASEAN and Europe.

Lessons from Other Regional Security Cooperation and Their
Implications for Northeast Asia: E and ASEAN Cases

¶10. ASEAN was recognized as on of the more successful cases of
regional securiy cooperation, as it has overcome suspicion and
hostility while enhancing mutual trust and transparency. ASEAN’s
success was attributed to political will, leadership commitment, the
“ASEAN Way”, pragmatism and external support. The role of track II
mechanisms was also valuable in realizing ASEAN’s goals of regional
stability and security. The experiences of the European Union and
the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) were
regarded as other successful examples of regional security
cooperation. European experiences may not be easily applicable to
Northeast Asia at this time but the Northeast Asia region has a lot
to learn from European experiences in terms of transparency,
enhancing mutual confidence and fostering cooperation.

¶11. Contextual differences notwithstanding, Northeast Asia may learn
from the experiences of ASEAN and Europe. The lessons to be learned
include political leadership, commitment towards regional
cooperation, more institutionalized patterns of cooperation, and
multiple layers of interaction (bilateral, trilateral, sub-regional,
regional, global). Effective utilization of track II mechanisms in
promoting regional cooperation in Northeast Asia was also
emphasized.

Enhancement of Multilateral Security Cooperation in Northeast Asia

¶12. Although Northeast Asia’s security environment is complicated by
various traditional and non-traditional security issues coupled with
the rise of nationalist sentiments and the contentious DPRK nuclear
issue, these challenges can be met by simultaneous dialogue-oriented
and action-oriented multilateral cooperation from top-down and
bottom-up approach which could eventually lead to comprehensive
security cooperation in the region. While such cooperation has not
yet been institutionalized in Northeast Asia, a number of
significant multilateral efforts have emerged at the official and
track II levels. It was recognized that the Six-Party Talk process
could pave the way for multilateral cooperation, not only in the
security areas but also in other areas.

¶13. While there is a need to enhance multilateral security
cooperation in Northeast Asia, it must be ensured that its
development or evolution would not undermine existing region-wide
mechanisms. ARF can and should contribute to multilateral security
in Northeast Asia and the wider East Asian region.

Recommendations

¶14. The following ideas were proposed regarding the enhancement of
multilateral security cooperation in Northeast Asia:

– Encourage regional dialogue and cooperation in the peaceful
settlement of disputes and ensure that cooperative mechanisms are
effective, efficient, flexible, and mutually responsive to the
rapidly changing world

– Strengthen regional capacity, including the provision of human,
technical and financial assistance, particularly in the areas of
conflict prevention, crisis management and post-conflict
stabilization

– Organize small working groups of EEPs for in-depth discussion on
important security issues, such as secure energy supply,
environmental degradation and Northeast Asian multilateral security
cooperation. Furthermore, government officials participating in
working group meetings as observers may convene separate meetings,
and exchange views on how to make best use of policy recommendations
proposed by the EEPs; and

– Use ARF meetings as opportunities for the participants of the Six
Party Talk process and other interested ARF participants to hold
separate meetings to discuss various security issues in Northeast
Asia including the promotion of multilateral security cooperation in

MANILA 00000553 003.3 OF 003

the region.

Manila, 6 February 2007

End quote
KENNEY

   

 

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