Oct 042014
 

http://wikileaks.org/cable/2010/01/10USUNNEWYORK37.html#
Reference ID Created Released Classification Origin
10USUNNEWYORK37
2010-01-22 17:45
2011-08-30 01:44
CONFIDENTIAL
USUN New York

VZCZCXRO5579
OO RUEHDH RUEHSL
DE RUCNDT #0037/01 0221745
ZNY CCCCC ZZH
O 221745Z JAN 10
FM USMISSION USUN NEW YORK
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC IMMEDIATE 8041
INFO RUCNDSC/DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHYY/GENEVA CD COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHII/VIENNA IAEA POSTS COLLECTIVE PRIORITY
RUEHML/AMEMBASSY MANILA PRIORITY 0358
C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 USUN NEW YORK 000037

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: DECL: 01/19/2020
TAGS: PREL PARM RP
SUBJECT: AMBASSADOR DICARLO MEETS NPT PRESIDENT-ELECT LIBRAN CABATULAN

Classified By: Ambassador Rosemary DiCarlo for reasons 1.4 (b) and (c).

¶1. (C) SUMMARY. Ambassador DiCarlo on January 18 met Libran
Cabactulan, the Filipino President-elect of the 2010 NPT
Review Conference, to convey USG priorities on strengthening
the NPT and to elicit his views on managing the Review
Conference (RevCon) process. Ambassador DiCarlo said the USG
sees success at the RevCon as the culmination of President
Obama’s nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation agenda.
She said the RevCon should encourage signatories to make the
Additional Protocol the international standard, examine ways
to address the NPT’s withdrawal provisions, and carefully
manage the Middle East nuclear issue. Cabactulan said
President Obama has made inspiring statements regarding
nuclear disarmament and the new U.S. engagement is visible,
but he said he feared that the positions of the parties are
still far apart. Despite the positive stance, he said, the
U.S. needs to be more forthcoming on its proposals and
minimize suspicions. He remarked that the Middle East will
be a defining issue during the RevCon but that it must be
approached in a holistic fashion. END SUMMARY.

¶2. (C) Ambassador DiCarlo on January 18 met Libran
Cabactulan, the Filipino President-elect of the 2010 NPT
Review Conference, to convey USG priorities on strengthening
the NPT and to elicit his views on managing the Review
Conference (RevCon) process. Ambassador DiCarlo said the
U.S. has high hopes for the NPT RevCon in May and views the
Conference as the culmination of President Obama’s nuclear
disarmament and non-proliferation agenda. She said the
President’s Prague speech, early agreements with the Russian
Federation on continuing negotiations on START, the Security
Council Summit in September 2009 and the adoption of
resolution 1887, and the forthcoming Nuclear Security Summit
in Washington, D.C. all demonstrate the President’s firm
commitment to nuclear disarmament, nuclear non-proliferation
and specifically the NPT. The United States, she said, would
like the RevCon to encourage signatories to adopt the
Additional Protocol as the international standard for IAEA
safeguards and examine ways to address the NPT’s withdrawal
provisions based on Article X of the treaty. Ambassador
DiCarlo said the RevCon’s handling of the implementation of
the 1995 RevCon’s resolution on the Middle East must be
carefully managed.

¶3. (C) Cabactulan offered his opinions on a range of issues,
noting that many of these reflect a growing consensus in the
Non-Aligned Movement (NAM). He said that President Obama’s
statements are welcome and the new U.S. engagement is
visible. However, he said that suspicion surrounds the
change in U.S. policy, and he recommended that the U.S. make
its proposals more visible and its actions concrete. He said
that the U.S. and Russia must complete negotiations on START
follow-on before the RevCon in May; not doing so is
“unthinkable” and would send a bad signal to other parties
about commitments to nuclear disarmament. Cabactulan said
the positive engagement of the U.S. during the 2009 UN
General Assembly First Committee and change in votes were
welcome, but the U.S. should do more to advertise its change
of positions. He said delegations are concerned that the
Nuclear Security Summit to be held in Washington in April
will eclipse the RevCon given the Summit’s high-level
attendance. Moreover, Cabactulan said states are worried
that the U.S. will encourage the creation of another
Proliferation Security Initiative during the Summit and focus
too extensively on nuclear security at the expense of rights
to nuclear power. Also worrying, he said, was that the
completion of the Nuclear Posture Review had been postponed
and ratification of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT)
is in doubt. Despite these setbacks, Cabactulan praised the
attendance of Secretary Clinton at the CTBT’s Article XIV
Conference in September.

¶4. (C) Regarding the resolution on the Middle East adopted
during the 1995 RevCon, Cabactulan said this will be “one of
the defining issues” in May, but he judged that the
Conference will not be held hostage to one issue or by one
delegation. He said there are “pent-up emotions” on this
topic. However, states believe the Middle East must be
considered in holistic terms of disarmament and
non-proliferation and not focused on just Israel. He
remarked that Israel is surrounded by enemies so he
personally understands its position, but an international
conference on this issue would allow for a frank discussion
of nuclear disarmament and build confidence in the region.
Regarding the Additional Protocol, Cabactulan offered that
this issue is traditionally handled in Vienna at the IAEA but
it is a topic that merits attention at the RevCon. Egypt, he
said, is critical of the minimal IAEA inspections of Israel’s

USUN NEW Y 00000037 002 OF 002

nuclear program. Inspections are neither intrusive nor
frequent, but every other state must abide by different
standards. As a result, Cabactulan opined that the
Additional Protocol is linked to progress on nuclear
disarmament in the Middle East. When pressed on precisely
what states–particularly the Arab states–would accept as
“progress” on implementing the resolution on the Middle East,
Cabactulan suggested that an international conference on this
issue is probably sufficient. He said during NPT Preparatory
Committee in May 2009, the original draft recommendations to
the RevCon contained suggestions to hold an international
conference on how to implement the 1995 resolution on the
Middle East. Although the early drafts were subsequently
discarded, there appeared to be a consensus on this issue.
RICE

   

 

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