About Us

 

Preamble

This website was rebuilt in the spring of 2013, we reposted all of our old articles from our original website, so the dates you see below posts could reflect the date we re-posted articles. All posts after our completion date (still to be posted) are correct posted dates.

Our Name

 

YONIP is more than just the reverse of “PINOY” a colloquial word for a “Filipino” or native of the Philippines it stands for Yes, Observe National Independence & Peace.

It is not an organization. It is a website put up by individuals who envision a free, peaceful and progressive Philippines in a world where the right to self-determination of nations, big or small, is recognized and respected.

YONIP is more than just a name. It is a voice.

 

It is a cry for freedom and equality. It is a demand for truth, justice, and human rights.

It is an expression of hope that the best in man would prevail over the worst in man so that true brotherhood of races could be achieved. Thus, YONIP is a strong objection to U.S. military intervention.

YONIP is a preference for peaceful means to peace, for the promotion and enhancement of life rather than its destruction. When war, rather than man’s spiritual values, is rendered obsolete then YONIP becomes a song of thanksgiving and celebration.

 

Our Logo

3yonip

The predominance of the color green pronounces the value given to an environment conducive to life.

The red shadow on green text shows active, not passive involvement.

The reflection, including that of the rays of the sun, on predominantly blue waters qualifies the type of involvement– it signifies introspection and retrospection, critical thinking and enlightened action to achieve peace and progress.

The white dove in flight symbolizes freedom and the purity and beauty of truth, unrestricted.

The three stars represent the three main island groupings of the Philippines — Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao. It also represents the three graces — faith, hope and love.

The use of the bamboo as the main image emphasizes the nurturing, life-giving nature of man plus his strength and resilience even in the face of tremendous pressure.

All elements used combine to show confidence in man and his ability to effect meaningful existence.

Bend, but don’t Break (Unknown Author)

One of my fondest memories as a child is going by the river and sitting idly on the bank. There I would enjoy the peace and quiet, watch the water rush downstream, and listen to the chirps of birds and the rustling of leaves in the trees. I would also watch the bamboo trees bend under pressure from the wind and watch them return gracefully to their upright or original position after the wind had died down.

When I think about the bamboo tree’s ability to bounce back or return to it’s original position, the word resilience comes to mind. When used in reference to a person this word means the ability to readily recover from shock, depression or any other situation that stretches the limits of a person’s emotions.

Have you ever felt like you are about to snap? Have you ever felt like you are at your breaking point? Thankfully, you have survived the experience to live to talk about it.

During the experience you probably felt a mix of emotions that threatened your health. You felt emotionally drained, mentally exhausted and you most likely endured unpleasant physical symptoms. Life is a mixture of good times and bad times, happy moments and unhappy moments. The next time you are experiencing one of those bad times or unhappy moments that take you close to your breaking point, bend but don’t break. Try your best not to let the situation get the best of you.

A measure of hope will take you through the unpleasant ordeal. With hope for a better tomorrow or a better situation, things may not be as bad as they seem to be. The unpleasant ordeal may be easier to deal with if the end result is worth having.

If the going gets tough and you are at your breaking point, show resilience. Like the bamboo tree, bend, but don’t break!

Our thanks to Earl Dionisio for giving us our name and to Maricel Magdamit for designing our logo.

Website Background Image

Narra philippines

The rich red wood seen as the background of our website is lumber made from Narra (Pterocarpus indicus) it is also the Philippine National Symbol or Mga Pambansang Sagisag ng Pilipinas.

When we talk of the Philippine Narra tree (Pterocarpus indicus Willd), we speak of ornamental avenue tree or the excellent highly prized reddish, rose-scented timber regarded for its beauty and termite resistant quality for furniture and building purposes. Less known is that this same tree has an abundance of medicinal uses for healing, so it shows us that with education and knowledge we too can be strong and we can heal ourselves as a nation, thus this tree makes a perfect background image for our website.

 

Editor In Chief

 

forging02_smallPrimary Resource Person is Roland G. Simbulan, Full Professor and former Vice Chancellor of the University of the Philippines. Roland was elected Faculty Regent, U.P. System on November 2005. As Faculty Regent, he represented the 3,600 faculty members of the University in the U.P. Board of Regents, the highest policy making body of the University of the Philippines System. He is a specialist on Philippine-U.S. security relations, Philippine foreign policy, U.S. bases and U.S. military intervention, and U.S. neo-colonial policies in the Philippines. Simbulan is a 2008 University of the Philippines Centennial Professorial Chair Awardee. See Full Profile


Professor Roland Simbulan launched a new book (December 5th 2009) that is directly related to the subject matter of our website.

The book is called “Forging a Nationalist Foreign Policy” As webmaster of YONIP, I would highly recommend reading this book as it will advance your knowledge in regards to sovereignty and independence issues of the Philippines.

 

 

Our Websites Background

 

tank

U.S. tank intrudes into Philippine village during Balikatan war exercises

The Philippines, itself, has no foreign enemies. On the other hand, the U.S. has made a lot of hostile, violent, powerful enemies because of its intervention in Asian affairs — all for the control of oil and the benefit of the U.S. arms industries. Would Americans, in general, be in favor of their government’s foreign relations policies and actions if they knew that national security and world peace is the price that their government is willing to pay for more power and wealth? We think, not.

The Philippines has about 100 Abu Sayyaf bandits — who have successfully conducted numerous kidnap-for-ransom and other heinous crimes. Evidence had been submitted proving that the Abu Sayyaf are protected by local military and government officials. Instead of good intelligence and police work, the Philippines and the U.S. governments have decided to make the Philippines — because of these 100 Abu Sayyaf — the second front of the U.S. war on terrorism. If the Filipinos knew the root cause and the implications of foreign intervention on local affairs, would they be in favor of their government’s management of this issue? We think, not.

To support such a war, military budgets have been significantly increased. Perhaps, the U.S. could afford this, but in the case of the Philippines, this means lower budget for its “war” on poverty, ignorance, diseases — already low and insufficient to begin with. The Philippines doesn’t even enforce the U.S’. clean-up of toxic waste left by the two U.S. bases that were tenants of the Philippines for almost 100 years, and here they go again. What’s wrong with this picture? Do we have an insufficiency of toxic waste that we’re trying to fill? Has toxic waste become a rare, valuable commodity we’re eager to amass?

The Philippines, indeed, has the makings of another Vietnam or Afghanistan. But national sovereignty and peace is not the only issue here. At stake is world peace. At stake are the lives of people all over the world and the ideals of truth, justice, freedom, equality and democracy. We are building a world conducive to racial discrimination and prejudice, violence, vengeance, exploitation, and the obsolescence of man as we know man to be. Can’t we build, instead, an environment of peace and brotherhood?

 

 

Our Theme

 

This site will tackle issues on SOVEREIGNTY and PEACE. This could include issues that affect political and economic sovereignty, e.g. globalization, health and education, food sufficiency, etc.. But, primary thrust will be on U.S. military intervention in the Philippines and related issues, e.g. bases, visiting forces agreement, toxic waste, etc.

It would not be right, however, to tackle Philippine national issues without recognizing the fact that the Philippines does not and cannot live in isolation from the rest of the world. So, even while we work towards national sovereignty, identity and pride, we are concerned with the rest of the world’s struggle for truth and peace. We are one with peacemakers, worldwide.

Our Vision

 

This site will tackle issues on SOVEREIGNTY and PEACE. This could include issues that affect political and economic sovereignty, e.g. globalization, health and education, food sufficiency, etc.. But, primary thrust will be on U.S. military intervention in the Philippines and related issues, e.g. bases, visiting forces agreement, toxic waste, etc.

 

It would not be right, however, to tackle Philippine national issues without recognizing the fact that the Philippines does not and cannot live in isolation from the rest of the world. So, even while we work towards national sovereignty, identity and pride, we are concerned with the rest of the world’s struggle for truth and peace. We are one with peacemakers, worldwide.

“You may say I’m a dreamer but I’m not the only one. I hope someday you’ll join us and the world will live as one.” ~John Lennon~

Our Mission

 

(1) To help educate and inform people by being a gateway to truth.

Providing easy access to those who seek knowledge and enlightenment. Letting absolute truth rise above the noise and clutter of lies, half-lies and propaganda. For we believe that “knowledge is power” and “the truth shall set you free.”

(2)To promote freedom, democracy, justice through peaceful, non-violent endeavors.

To help inculcate an anti-war, pro-life, nuclear-free consciousness among Filipinos, primarily, and among Americans, secondarily — for as citizens of the richest, most powerful country in the world, Americans, through its government, bear the responsibility of ensuring that such power is not used to exploit, abuse and murder the very ideals and values that made the U.S. the great nation that it is.

(3)To encourage strong demand for programs and infrastructures that bring about real national security and sovereignty for the Philippines,

i.e. education, health & nutrition, agrarian reform and food sufficiency, housing, countryside development, gainful employment, environment safety — and, to this, we must add the preservation of our culture and heritage and the development of national pride so that as a people we stop being vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.

(4) To reach the greatest number of Filipinos and Americans

— empowering them with knowledge needed for critical thinking and assessment of their government’s international relations and how these impact on their lives and on world peace. We are confident that a huge number of informed people could make a difference, in that governments would have no choice but to give in to the just demands of its citizens.

(5)To provide a place in the net for like-minded people to converge and unite,

for only a solid united front for a peaceful, nuclear-free world — where nations could enjoy true sovereignty, self-sufficiency and peace — could victory be achieved against such a formidable foe as the military-industrial complex.

“If we have no peace, it is because we’ve forgotten that we belong to each other.” ~Mother Teresa~

The YONIP Admin Team

Editor in Chief – Roland G. Simbulan

Webmaster – Reinier Kanis
Webmaster’s Disclaimer – The views posted in this website are not necessarily the views of the webmaster, my role is to provide the means of alternate views as governed by our Editor in Chief.

Contact Us